A young dolphin found stranded in shallow water in Lighthouse Lakes near Port Aransas was rescued and released.The Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network was assisted by SeaWorld San Antonio\'s Rescue Team. PHOTOS: Young dolphin found stranded rescued\"With the help of SeaWorld\'s rescue team, we were successfully able to reach the dolphin and bring it on board the rescue boat for a medical assessment,\" said Heidi Whitehead, TMMSN executive director. \"Working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, it was determined the dolphin was in good body condition to be released. We then tagged the animal so we can continue to track its well-being. The dolphin was then relocated to deeper water near the Aransas Channel.\"SeaWorld officials said it is believed the dolphin became stranded during a recent extreme high tide.After being spotted by a local fisherman in the same place for several days, the TMMSN was called in to help the animal, officials said.[WATCH: Dolphin rescue May 10, 2017]\"This is a true success story,\" Whitehead said. \"Thanks to the combined efforts of our alert citizenry coupled with the expertise of SeaWorld\'s Rescue Team and our tireless TMMSN Critical Care Team, we were able to help this dolphin. The green tag ...
Texas has been awarded $27.4 million in federal funds to combat opioid-use disorders, officials announced Friday.The Texas Health and Human Services Commission announced the news about the grant, provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.The money will help the state\'s efforts aimed at preventing and treating prescription and illicit opioid dependence, according to a news release.Opioid use is a problem nationwide. Of the more than 33,000 opioid-related deaths in the United States in 2015, 1,186 took place in Texas, officials said.The $27.4 million in grant money will be used for prevention, training, outreach, treatment and recovery support services.It\'s estimated that about 14,000 people will receive help in the next two years.State officials hope to expand the capacity and access to treatment sites across Texas and eliminate the current waitlist for services, and increase training and technical assistance to providers and prescribers to ensure the use of best practices for preventing and treating opioid addiction, among other efforts.The following groups are especially at-risk for opioid-use disorders: those in major metro areas, women who are pregnant and postpartum and people with a history of prescription opioid misuse. Download the Click2Houston news app in your app store to stay up-to-date ...
More Texas children could soon have seat belts on the buses they ride to school.The state House approved legislation 91-43 on Thursday requiring new school buses, 2018 models and newer, to have safety belts. The Senate approved a similar measure last month.Supporters say seat belts cost around $7,000 on new buses costing around $100,000 total. About 1.1 million students ride Texas school buses per day.The proposal doesn\'t include extra state funding, but schools districts can opt out if they can\'t afford buses with seat belts.Those opposing the bill say they aren\'t anti-safety, but that installation is costly and schools can use funding for other priorities.The Legislature approved $10 million for optional school bus seat belts in 2009, but very few school districts actually installed them. Download the Click2Houston news app in your app store to stay up-to-date with the latest news while you\'re on the go.Sign up for KPRC 2 newsletters to get breaking news, sports, entertainment, contests and more delivered straight to your email inbox.
The Texas unemployment rate held steady during April at 5 percent, the Texas Workforce Commission reported Friday.Last month\'s jobless figure mirrored the March unemployment rate, according to a TWC statement . Nationwide unemployment for April was 4.4 percent.Amarillo had the lowest unemployment across Texas last month at 3 percent. The McAllen-Edinburg-Mission area had the state\'s highest jobless rate for April at 8 percent, the commission reported.Texas has added 258,900 jobs over the past year, according to Andres Alcantar, commission chairman.\"Texas employers continue to create jobs in the broad based Texas economy with 10 of the 11 industries expanding over the year,\" Alcantar said.The Texas economy expanded in April with the addition of 30,400 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs. Manufacturing expanded by 8,100 jobs last month, according to the TWC.Employment in the state\'s education and health services industry recorded the largest private-industry gain over the month with 10,400 jobs added in April. Manufacturing employment grew by 8,100 jobs in April.Professional and business services employment expanded by 7,400 jobs, officials said.\"Positive economic growth means continued employment opportunities for the expanding Texas labor force,\" Commissioner Julian Alvarez said.
One firefighter is dead after a massive 4-alarm fire at a Northwest Side shopping center Thursday night, the San Antonio Fire Department said.Fire crews responded to the blaze in the 6700 block of Ingram Road about 9:12 p.m.Due to the time of day and there being a gym in the shopping center, crews performed a search and rescue to make sure no one was inside.San Antonio Fire Chief Charles Hood said crews went in and due to the conditions of the fire changing, a few firefighters were missing.READ MORE about this story at KSAT.comTwo firefighters were pulled out of the building. One was taken to the San Antonio Military Medical Center in Priority 1 condition. The second firefighter, who was part of the rescue team, was taken to University Hospital in Priority 2 condition. Hood said the pair are expected to be OK.Hood said the fire was so intense that parts of the building started collapsing and crews had to go on the defensive. He said it was a very rough decision to leave a firefighter behind.\"That\'s not what we do, but we had the risk of losing an additional, probably, 15 to 20 firefighters if we did not go ...
The Texas Senate has voted to create statewide regulations for ride-hailing companies, potentially voiding a local Austin ordinance that caused Uber and Lyft to stop operating in the state capital.Given final approval 20-10 on Wednesday, the bill brings ride-hailing companies under Texas regulatory control and imposes fees.The bill previously cleared the House, which included tea party-backed language defining \"sex\" as the \"physical condition of being male or female.\" That\'s a reference to the Legislature\'s contentious \"bathroom bill,\" which is separate legislation regulating transgender Texans\' public restroom use.The Senate preserved that language. Sponsoring Sen. Charles Schwertner, said, \"it\'s stating the obvious.\"Uber and Lyft left Austin last year, protesting an ordinance requiring drivers to be fingerprinted in background checks. The bill requires annual background checks, but not fingerprinting. Download the Click2Houston news app in your app store to stay up-to-date with the latest news while you\'re on the go.Sign up for KPRC 2 newsletters to get breaking news, sports, entertainment, contests and more delivered straight to your email inbox.
One of the scariest, and perhaps funniest, golf shot celebrations happened at a Texas Topgolf location, not on the links.On early Sunday morning, Twitter user Nathan (@EnvyNate) posted a video of a man, who he says is his cousin, lining up a shot on the second level of the newly-opened Topgolf Fort Worth location. The cousin swings at the golf ball and misses.The video then shows him \'celebrating\' his hit by pointing and looking into the night sky. He walks off the green tee mat while still looking into the air, then inadvertently steps over the yellow line that reads \'No Step\' on the platform.\n \n My cousin fell at @Topgolf #Tolpgolfdfw #fortworth ?????? pic.twitter.com/9TtytKtJy8-- Nathan ?? (@EnvyNate) May 14, 2017 \n He falls off the platform into the netting just below when the video cuts off. The video has been shared and viewed on social media sites millions of times.In another video posted to Twitter taken from the level below, the man can be seen in the netting, struggling to get out.\n \n @josie28673 pic.twitter.com/6rrMcHnjO1-- David Cazares (@davidcazares777) May 14, 2017 \n Topgolf tweeted to Nathan asking, \"@EnvyNate, we would love to chat about this and make sure he ...
The man accused of the deadly stabbing rampage at the University of Texas in Austin went before a judge Wednesday. Kendrex White is accused of killing one student and injuring three others, including one student from Katy.During Wednesday\'s hearing, the state requested a competency and sanity exam for White.The judge asked for more of his medical records after White spoke exclusively to Channel 2 from jail and said he had no memory of stabbing anyone.During the exclusive interview White said he remembers waking up Monday, May 1, skipping class and walking around the campus with a knife.
A summer camping and retreat business in Huntsville will pay $70,000 to settle a lawsuit over an employee who was allegedly demoted due to a complication with her pregnancy, then fired for complaining about the demotion.In the lawsuit, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission charged that Carolina Creek Christian Camps demoted Korrie L. Reed from her position as camp registrar after learning she had developed gestational diabetes during pregnancy.The EEOC said Reed never requested a reassignment, but Carolina Creek\'s executive director said the job of registrar was too demanding for Reed because of her pregnancy and medical condition.The lawsuit claims Carolina Creek fired Reed and filed two different lawsuits against her after she told the executive director that demoting her was illegal.The EEOC filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division. The agency claimed Carolina Creek had violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Americans with Disabilities Act.As part of a settlement to the lawsuit, Carolina Creek will pay $70,000, and be prohibited from future discrimination and retaliation through an injunction. The company will also have to implement non-discrimination policies and provide annual anti-discrimination training for company ...
The Texas House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday giving victims of crime jailed for their testimony extra protection and legal representation. The state Senate already passed the bill, which now goes to Gov. Greg Abbott\'s desk for signature.The bill, named Jenny\'s Law in honor of a Harris County rape victim who was jailed for a month, was introduced by Sen. John Whitmire, following a series of Channel 2 investigative reports on Jenny\'s case.The bill requires a hearing for any witness held in jail on a writ of attachment, which is a legal document giving the county permission to hold a witness who has refused to testify. It also requires an attorney be appointed to represent the witness.If Abbott signs the bill, it will become law on Sept. 1.The story of Jenny, a jailed rape victimChannel 2 Investigates last July broke the story of \"Jenny,\" the case of a mentally ill rape victim who was locked up for nearly a month, and it triggered an avalanche of change in Harris County.Prosecutors received new training to help mentally ill victims. Incoming District Attorney Kim Ogg made Jenny\'s case a cornerstone of her campaign and defeated incumbent Devon Anderson, who defended the ...